his deadly imprisonment was the other

+++ ANTHONY: This is very true, cousin, indeed, and well objected too. But then you must consider that he is not in danger of death by reason of the prison into which he is put peradventure but for a little brawl, but his danger of death is by the other imprisonment, by which he is prisoner in the great prison of this whole earth, in which prison all the princes of the world be prisoners as well as he. If a man condemned to death were put up in a large prison, and while his execution were respited he were,…

forgetting ourselves

Socrates: Oh Phaedrus, if I don’t know my Phaedrus I must be forgetting who I am myself—and neither is the case. Phaedrus 228a. +++ Phaedrus: … Don’t make me say what you said: “Socrates, if I don’t know my Socrates, I must be forgetting who I am myself.” Phaedrus 336c +++ … Socrates: I do believe you will, so long as you are who you are. Phaedrus: Speak on, then, in full confidence. Phaedrus 243e +++ Socrates: When someone utters the word “iron” or “silver,” don’t we all think of the same thing? Phaedrus: Certainly. Socrates: But what happens when…

know how

A prince, therefore, need not necessarily have all the good qualities I mentioned above, but he should certainly appear to have them. I would even go so far as to say that if he has these qualities and always behaves accordingly he will find them harmful; if he only appears to have them they will render him service. He should appear to be compassionate, faithful to his word, kind, guileless, and devout. And indeed he should be so. But his disposition should be such that, if he needs to be the opposite, he knows how. You must realize this: that…

between

But since my intention is to say something that will prove of practical use to the inquirer, I have thought it proper to represent things as they are in a real truth, rather than as they are imagined. Many have dreamed up republics and principalities which have never in truth been known to exist; the gulf between how one should live and how one does live is so wide that a man who neglects what is actually done for what should be done moves towards self-destruction rather than self-preservation. The fact is that a man who wants to act virtuously…

he must study rivers

So [the Prince] must never let his thought stray from military exercises, which he must pursue more vigorously in peace than in war. These exercises can be both physical and mental. As for the first, besides keeping his men well organized and trained, he must always be out hunting, so accustoming his body to hardships and also learning some practical geography: how the mountains slope, how the valleys open, how the plains spread out. He must study rivers and marshes; and in all this he should take great pains. Such knowledge is useful in two ways: first, if he obtains…