reason your viceroy in me, me should defend

“On the other hand,” I said, “if there are any examples, in the speeches or actions of distinguished men, of endurance in the face of everything, then these are models for our guardians to observe and listen to. For example:  He smote his chest, and thus rebuked his heart.  ‘Bear up, my heart. You have borne yet worse than this.’  “Yes, those are unquestionably the right models,” he said.  -Plato, The Republic, Book III, 390; quoting the Odyssey, 20.17-18 +++ Heart, my heart, so battered with misfortune far beyond your strength, up, and face the men who hate us. Bare your chest…

completed partly (2)

+++ Nor will his vision of the beautiful take the form of a face, or of hands, or of anything that is of the flesh. It will be neither words, nor knowledge, nor a something that exists in something else, such as a living creature, or the earth, or the heavens, or anything that is — but subsisting of itself and by itself in an eternal oneness, while every lovely thing partakes of it in such sort that, however much the parts may wax and wane, it will be neither more nor less, but still the same inviolable whole. Symposium …

study in water

+++ Well, after this, said Socrates, when I was worn out with my physical investigations, it occurred to me that I must guard against the same sort of risk which people run when they watch and study an eclipse of the sun; they really do sometimes injure their eyes, unless they study its reflection in water or some other medium. I conceived of something like this happening to myself, and I was afraid that by observing objects with my eyes and trying to comprehend them with each of my other senses I might blind my soul altogether. So I decided…

in the same service as the swans

+++ Does the absolute reality which we define in our discussions remain always constant and invariable, or not? Does absolute equality or beauty or any other independent entity which really exists ever admit change of any kind? Or does each one of these uniform and independent entities remain always constant and invariable, never admitting any alteration in any respect or in any sense?        They must be constant and invariable, Socrates, said Cebes.        Well, what about the concrete instances of beauty—such as men, horses, clothes, and so on—or of equality, or any other members of…

it is the living

+++        Is not what we call death a freeing and separation of soul from body?       Certainly, he said.       And the desire to free the soul is found chiefly, or rather only, in the true philosopher. In fact the philosopher’s occupation consists precisely in the freeing and separation of soul from body. Isn’t that so?       Apparently.       Well then, as I said at the beginning, if a man has trained himself throughout his life to live in a state as close as possible to death, would it not be ridiculous for…