brutal

+++If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend I hope I should have the guts to betray my country. -E.M. Forster, What I Believe+++ The best thing I could say in honour of Shakespeare, the man, is that he believed in Brutus, and cast not a shadow of suspicion on the kind of virtue which Brutus represents! It is to him that Shakespeare consecrated his best tragedy. It is at present still called by a wrong name, to him, and to the most terrible essence of lofty morality. Independence of soul! that is the question at…

Quotes – Nietzsche, "Thus Spoke Zarathustra"

“And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at lest once. And we should cal every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh.” “To every soul there belongs another world; for every soul, every other soul is an afterworld. Precisely between what is most similar, illusion lies most beautifully; for the smallest cleft is the hardest to bridge.” “O Zarathustra,” the animals said, “to those who think as we do, all things themselves are dancing: they come and offer their hands and laugh and flee — and come back. Everything goes,…

Nietzsche, niche

“In summa: the world as it ought to be exists; this world, in which we live, is an error — this world of ours ought not to exist.…The belief that the world as it ought to be is, really exists, is a belief of the unproductive who do not desire to create a world as it ought to be. They posit it as already available, they seek ways oand means of reaching it. “Will to truth” — as the failure of the will to create.” -Friedrich Nietzsche, from The Will to Power

Nietzsche, niche

“What therefore is truth? A mobile army of metaphors, metonymies, anthropomorphisms: in short a sum of human relations which became poetically and rhetorically intensified, metamorphosed, adorned, and after long usage seem to a notion fixed, canonic, and binding; truths are ilusions of which one has forgotten that they are illusions; worn-out metaphors which have become powerless to affect the senses; coins which have their obverse effaced and now are no longer of account as coins but merely as metal.” –Nietzsche, from On Truth and Lying in an Extra-moral Sense