‘Literate

+++What lover has he not outloved? What sage has he not outseen? -EMERSON from The Poet, or, Shakespeare +++ …This pursued through volumes would perhaps take us no further than this, that with a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration… -KEATS from the letters +++ “Obliterate the reader.”“Obliterate yourself before the reader.” -BLANCHOT  from Literature and the Right to Death  +++

My Shakespeare, my Shakespeare

+++ …why hast thou forsaken me? +++ “The story goes that, before or after he died, he found himself before God and he said: ‘I, who have been so many men in vain, want to be one man: myself.’ The voice of God replied from a whirlwind: ‘Neither am I one self; I dreamed the world as you dreamed your work, my Shakespeare, and among the shapes of my dream are you, who, like me, are many persons—and none.’ -BORGES, “Everything and Nothing”  +++ Sunday [21 Dec. 1817] Hampstead SundayMY DEAR BROTHERS,I must crave your pardon for not having written…

King Lear and the Very Bad Hair Day

OR King Leir and the Very Bad Heir Day The thing about King Lear for me is its bigness. Lear has big hair. Eighties big, teased out—And a crown of weeds, even! I feel little next to Lear. My hair cannot compete. It cannot. A.C. Bradley, probably the most influential 20th century critic of Shakespearian tragedy, agrees. He has written that to understand King Lear is to understand that we must “renounce the world, hate it, and lose it gladly. The only real thing in it is the soul, with its courage, patience, devotion. And nothing outward can touch that.”…

I shall call the world a school.

+++ From the Letters of John Keats To George and Georgiana Keats, Sunday, February 14th, Monday 3 May 1819 …The common cognomen of this world among the misguided and superstitious is ‘a vale of tears’ from which we are to be redeemed by a certain arbitary interposition of God and taken to Heaven-What a little circumscribed straightened notion! Call the world if you Please “The vale of Soul-making”. Then you will find out the use of the world (I am speaking now in the highest terms for human nature admitting it to be immortal which I will here take for granted…

Velvet ears

+++ TO THE RIVER OTTER by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Dear native brook! wild streamlet of the West!How many various-fated years have passed,What happy and what mournful hours, since lastI skimmed the smooth thin stone along thy breast,Numbering its light leaps! Yet so deep impressedSink the sweet scenes of childhood, that mine eyesI never shut amid the sunny ray,But straight with all their tints thy waters rise,Thy crossing plank, thy marge with willows grey,And bedded sand that, veined with various dyes,Gleamed through thy bright transparence! On my way,Visions of childhood! oft have ye beguiledLone manhood’s cares, yet waking fondest sighs:Ah! that…

The Garden

+++ …by love into a single volume bound,the pages scattered through the universe… –DANTE +++ Those thoughts to me were oaks. –SHAKESPEARE +++ …a book made full of days (pages),a ready effort full of all places thenthat may be because I have loved them… –DUNCAN +++ Every book is a quotation; and every house is a quotationout of all forests and mines and stone quarries; and everyman is a quotation from all his ancestors. –EMERSON +++ To ask or search I blame thee not, for heavenIs as the book of God before thee set,Wherein to read his wondrous works, and…

‘The dejected King of Day’ — Fragments from Hyperion: A Fragment (Keats)

Fragments from ‘Hyperion: A Fragment’ by John Keats +++ Forest on forest hung above his head Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there +++ But oh! how unlike marble was that face: How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more beautiful than beauty’s self +++ O aching time! O moments big as years! All as ye pass swell out the monstrous truth, And press it so upon our weary griefs That unbelief has not a space to breathe. Saturn, sleep on: — O thoughtless, why did I Thus violate thy slumbrous solitude? Why should I ope…