Unbecoming conjunctions

From Jane Austen’s Persuasion. +++ There was a momentary expression in Captain Wentworth’s face at this speech, a certain glance of his bright eye, and curl of his handsome mouth, which convinced Anne, that instead of sharing in Mrs Musgrove’s kind wishes, as to her son, he had probably been at some pains to get rid of him; but it was too transient an indulgence of self-amusement to be detected by any who understood him less than herself; in another moment he was perfectly collected and serious, and almost instantly afterwards coming up to the sofa, on which she and…

To be fallen in love with: Duly inferior: Aspired to a shrubbery.

+++ From Mansfield Park +++“Her brother was not handsome: no, when they first saw him he was absolutely plain, black and plain; but still he was the gentleman, with a pleasing address. The second meeting proved him not so very plain: he was plain, to be sure, but then he had so much countenance, and his teeth were so good, and he was so well made, that one soon forgot he was plain; and after a third interview, after dining in company with him at the Parsonage, he was no longer allowed to be called so by anybody. He was, in…

At least two hours, Margaret!!

+++ Jane Austen, from Sense and Sensibility, chapter 9 +++ “They gaily ascended the downs, rejoicing in their own penetration at every glimpse of blue sky; and when they caught in their faces the animating gales of a high southwesterly wind, they pitied the fears which had prevented their mother and Elinor from sharing such delightful sensations. ‘Is there a felicity in the world,’ said Marianne, ‘superior to this?- Margaret, we will walk here at least two hours.’ Margaret agreed, and they pursued their way against the wind, resisting it with laughing delight for about twenty minutes longer, when suddenly…

Now, to marry all the world.

+++Jane Austen, from Sense and Sensibility, chapter 8 +++ “Mrs. Jennings was a widow with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now, therefore, nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world. In the promotion of this object she was zealously active, as far as her ability reached; and missed no opportunity of projecting weddings among all the young people of her acquaintance. She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and…

Self-fulfilling Vocabulary

Rhodomontade, noun and adj. a. A vainglorious brag or boast; an extravagantly boastful, arrogant, or bombastic speech or piece of writing; †an arrogant act (obs.). THANKS JANE Amphiboly, noun.  1. Ambiguous discourse; a sentence which may be construed in two distinct senses; a quibble. (See amphibology n., which is the earlier and more popular word.)2. A figure of speech: Ambiguity arising from the uncertain construction of a sentence or clause, of which the individual words are unequivocal: thus distinguished by logicians from equivocation, though in popular use the two are confused. “though in popular use the two are confused” THANKS WILLIAM