vocab via de Man, Hegel

copula, noun. 1. Logic and Grammar. That part of a proposition which connects the subject and predicate; the present tense of the verb to be (with or without a negative) employed as a mere sign of predication. 2. gen. A connection; a link. 3. Anat. A part (e.g. a bone, cartilage, or ligament) connecting other parts. anacoluthon, n. An instance of anacoluthia: A want of grammatical sequence; the passing from one construction to another before the former is completed. genitive, adj. 1. genitive case n. a grammatical form of substantives and other declinable parts of speech, chiefly used to denote…

Found Poem: From Hegel’s ‘Phenomenology of Spirit’

The progressive unfolding of truth: The bud disappears in the bursting-forth blossom… Falsemanifestation, the fruit now emerges as truth instead. To lay aside “love of knowing,” and become “actual knowing” — That is whatI have set myself to do. The “beautiful” —the “eternal” –“religion” and “love” — Theseare the bait required to arouse the desire to bite. The eye of the Spirit forcibly turned,and held fast to the things of this world… Now we need just the opposite: Sense is so fast rooted in the earthly things that it requires.Broken with the world, hitherto inhabitedand imagined, Beauty hates Understanding for…

vocab via Hegel

predicate, noun.1. Logic. That which is said of a subject; esp. (in the traditional logic of categorical propositions) what is affirmed or denied of the subject of a proposition by means of the copula. For example, my father in this man is my father, mortal in all men are mortal.a. A quality, an attribute.b. A personal appellation or title that asserts something about the person who bears 2. Grammar. The part of a sentence or clause containing what is said about a subject (e.g. went home in John went home yesterday), sometimes excluding any adjunct (yesterday in this example). ratiocination,…

vocab via Cynthia Chase, Andrzej Warminski, Hegel

pleonasm, noun. a. Grammar and Rhetoric. The use of more words in a sentence or clause than are necessary to express the meaning; redundancy of expression either as a fault of style, or as a rhetorical figure used for emphasis or clarity. Also: an instance of this; a superfluously worded expression or phrase.b. The addition of an extra or superfluous letter or syllable to a word; a word extended in this way. Obs. rare.2. gen. Superfluity, redundancy, or excess; something superfluous or redundant. Cf. pleonastic adj. 2. convoke, verb. trans. To call together, summon to assemble; to assemble or bring…