trembling

+++ The career of Socrates shows clearly how little philosophers are worth in the common business of life. Though he was called wise by the oracle of Apollo–and that wasn’t the wisest of his judgments–he tried only once to bring up a matter of public business, and then he was hooted out of the assembly. In fact, he wasn’t altogether silly, for he declined the epithet of “wise,” saying it belonged only to a god; and he also said a sensible man should keep clear of public business. But he would have done better to warn anyone aspiring to be…

unchanging style; unbroken discourse

“…And now, if you would know it, among my most familiar friends I will publish in simple language what I think, on which I have always kept silence and deemed silence fitting. In my view, even the best orators, those who can speak with the utmost ease and elegance, unless they are diffident in approaching a discourse and diffident in beginning it, seem to border on the shameless, although that can never come to pass. For the better the orator, the more profoundly is he frightened of the difficulty of speaking, and of the doubtful fate of a speech, and…

calling it what it once had been

+++ XXIIThe same so sore annoyed has the knight,  That welnigh choked with the deadly stinke, His forces faile, ne can no lenger fight. Whose corage when the feend perceiv’d to shrinke, She poured forth out of her hellish sinke Her fruitfull cursed spawne of serpents small,  Deformed monsters, fowle, and blacke as inke, With swarming all about his legs did crall,And him encombred sore, but could not hurt at all. XXIII As gentle Shepheard in sweete even-tide, When ruddy Phoebus gins to welke in west,  High on an hill, his flocke to vewen wide, Markes which do byte their hasty supper best, A cloud of combrous gnattes do him molest, All striving…

lost lights

+++ The most widespread fellowship existing among men is that of all with all others. Here we must preserve the communal sharing of all the things that nature brings forth for the common use of mankind, in such a way that whatever is assigned by statutes and civil law should remain in such possession as those laws may have laid down, but the rest should be regarded as the Greek proverb has it: everything is common among friends. The things that are common to all men seem to be of the kind that Ennius defines in one case, from which…