calling it what it once had been

+++ XXIIThe same so sore annoyed has the knight,  That welnigh choked with the deadly stinke, His forces faile, ne can no lenger fight. Whose corage when the feend perceiv’d to shrinke, She poured forth out of her hellish sinke Her fruitfull cursed spawne of serpents small,  Deformed monsters, fowle, and blacke as inke, With swarming all about his legs did crall,And him encombred sore, but could not hurt at all. XXIII As gentle Shepheard in sweete even-tide, When ruddy Phoebus gins to welke in west,  High on an hill, his flocke to vewen wide, Markes which do byte their hasty supper best, A cloud of combrous gnattes do him molest, All striving…

King Lear and the Very Bad Hair Day

OR King Leir and the Very Bad Heir Day The thing about King Lear for me is its bigness. Lear has big hair. Eighties big, teased out—And a crown of weeds, even! I feel little next to Lear. My hair cannot compete. It cannot. A.C. Bradley, probably the most influential 20th century critic of Shakespearian tragedy, agrees. He has written that to understand King Lear is to understand that we must “renounce the world, hate it, and lose it gladly. The only real thing in it is the soul, with its courage, patience, devotion. And nothing outward can touch that.”…

Vocab (Aristotle)

deux ex machina A power, event, person, or thing that comes in the nick of time to solve a difficulty; providential interposition, esp. in a novel or play. cavil, v. 1. intr. ‘To raise captious and frivolous objections’ (J.); to object, dispute, or find fault unfairly or without good reason. Const. at, about(formerly also against, with, on). 2. trans. To object to or find fault with captiously. eschatology a. The department of theological science concerned with ‘the four last things: death, judgement, heaven, and hell’. encomium, n. A formal or high-flown expression of praise; a eulogy, panegyric.

Vocab (Aristotle)

deux ex machina A power, event, person, or thing that comes in the nick of time to solve a difficulty; providential interposition, esp. in a novel or play. cavil, v. 1. intr. ‘To raise captious and frivolous objections’ (J.); to object, dispute, or find fault unfairly or without good reason. Const. at, about(formerly also against, with, on). 2. trans. To object to or find fault with captiously. eschatology a. The department of theological science concerned with ‘the four last things: death, judgement, heaven, and hell’. encomium, n. A formal or high-flown expression of praise; a eulogy, panegyric.