double malady / double penance

+++Long languishing in double malady,  of my hearts wound and of my body’s grief:  there came to me a leech that would apply  fit medicines for my body’s best reliefVain man (quoth I) that hast but little prief:  in deep discovery of the mind’s disease,  is not the heart of all the body chief?  and rules the members as it self doth please.Then with some cordials seek first to appease,  the inward languor of my wounded heart,  and then my body shall have shortly ease:  but such sweet cordials pass Physicians art.Then my life’s Leech do you your skill reveal,  and with one salve both heart and body heal.Spenser 50+++O,…

obliquid / aliquid

+++ … that power and vertue which ye spake,That ye here worke, doth many changes take,And your owne natures change: for, each of youThat vertue have, or this, or that to make,Is checkt and changed from his nature trew,By others opposition or obliquid view. -Spenser, Mutability canto VII,  54 +++ Those hours, that with gentle work did frameThe lovely gaze where every eye doth dwell,Will play the tyrants to the very sameAnd that unfair which fairly doth excel:For never-resting time leads summer onTo hideous winter and confounds him there;Sap cheque’d with frost and lusty leaves quite gone,Beauty o’ersnow’d and bareness…

end / And, as the long divorce of steel falls on me … fall away / Like water from ye

+++ BUCKINGHAM: …You few that loved meAnd dare be bold to weep for Buckingham,His noble friends and fellows, whom to leaveIs only bitter to him, only dying:Go with me like good angels to my endAnd, as the long divorce of steel falls on me, Make of your prayers one sweet sacrificeAnd lift my soul to heaven. … Heaven has an end in all. Yet, you that hear me,This from a  dying man receive as certain:Where you are liberal of your loves and counsels,Be sure you be not loose; for those you make friendsAnd give your hearts to, when they once perceiveThe…

again

+++ FAUSTUS: Was this the face that launched a thousand shipsAnd burnt the topless towers of Ilium?Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss.[They kiss]Her lips sucks forth my soul. See where it flies!Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again.[They kiss again]Here will I dwell, for heaven be in these lips… –Dr Faustus A-text, 5.1 +++ ROMEO: If I profane with my unworthiest handThis holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready standTo smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. JULIET: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,Which mannerly devotion shows in this;For saints…

correct correction

+++ O Lord! I dread: and that I did not dread I me repent; and evermore desire Thee Thee to dread. I open here, and spread My fault to thee… O Lord! As I have thee both pray’d, and pray, (Although I Thee be no alteration. But that we men, like as ourselves, we say, Measuring thy justice by our mutation) Chastise me not, O Lord! In thy furor, Nor me correct in wrathful castigation For that thy arrows of fear, of terror, Of sword, of sickness, of famine, and of fire, Stick deep in me: I, lo! From mine…

all’s well, all is whole

LAFEU: What prince is that? CLOWN: The black prince, sir; alias, the prince of darkness; alias, the devil.LAFEU: Hold thee, there’s my purse: I give thee not this to suggest thee from thy master thou talkest of; serve him still. CLOWN:  I am a woodland fellow, sir, that always loved a great fire; and the master I speak of ever keeps a good fire. But, sure, he is the prince of the world; let his nobility remain in’s court. I am for the house with the narrow gate, which I take to be too little for pomp to enter: some that humble themselves may; but the many will be too chill and tender, and…

brutal

+++If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend I hope I should have the guts to betray my country. -E.M. Forster, What I Believe+++ The best thing I could say in honour of Shakespeare, the man, is that he believed in Brutus, and cast not a shadow of suspicion on the kind of virtue which Brutus represents! It is to him that Shakespeare consecrated his best tragedy. It is at present still called by a wrong name, to him, and to the most terrible essence of lofty morality. Independence of soul! that is the question at…

increase, perfection

+++ When I consider every thing that growsHolds in perfection but a little moment, -Sonnet 15 +++ I believe that artists often do not know what they can do best, because they are too vain and have fixed their minds on something prouder than those small plants seem to be that really can grow on their soil to perfection and are new, strange, and beautiful. They do not think much of what is actually good in their own garden or vineyard; and their love and insight are not of the same order. -Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Chapter 87, Of the vanity…

False sorrow’s tears

+++ KING RICHARD: And say, what store of parting tears were shed? AUMERLE: Faith, none for me, except the north-east wind,Which then grew bitterly against our faces,Awaked the sleeping rheum, and so by chanceDid grace our hollow parting with a tear. –Richard II, 1.4, 5-9 +++ BUSHY:Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadowsWhich shows like grief itself but is not so.For sorrow’s eye, glazed with blinding tears,Divides one thing entire to many objects—Like perspectives, which, rightly gazed upon,Show nothing but confusion; eyed awry,Distinguish form. So your sweet majesty,Looking awry upon your Lord’s departure,Finds shapes of grief more than himself…

Rhetorical things

chiasmus: A rhetorical or literary figure in which words, grammatical constructions, or concepts are repeated in reverse order, in the same or a modified form; inversion in the second of two parallel forms. But O, what damned minutes tells he o’erWho dotes, yet doubts; suspects, yet strong loves. —Shakespeare, Othello 3.3 antimetabole: the repetition of words or ideas in successive clauses, but in transposed grammatical order. Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. –JFK +++ Milton, Upon the Circumcision: O more exceeding love or law more just? Just law indeed, but…

In Othello’s Vise

OR OUR OTHELLO’S VICE Othello isn’t easy. As A.C. Bradley noted in 1913, “from the moment when the temptation of the hero begins, the reader’s heart and mind are held in a vise, experiencing the extremes of pity and fear, sympathy and repulsion, sickening hope and dreadful expectation.” I find this to be terribly true; in fact I have a hard time reading Othello or watching a production of Othello, and I think this is not only due to the fact that I ‘know what’s coming’ (as I do, or we all do, with most of Shakespeare’s classic plays) but…

The saint manqué

+++ “In Iago we have, I think, a very remarkable portrait by Shakespeare of the villain as an inverted saint, a saint manqué. On the surface, nothing might seem less probable. Yet Shakespeare was surely right in suggesting this, because the saint and the villain have very similar psychologies. In both, ethics and aesthetics become almost the same thing.” -AUDEN, Lectures on Shakespeare +++

Not love

+++ …Love’s not loveWhen it is mingled with regards that standsAloof from the entire point. -KING LEAR, Act 1, scene 1, lines 236-38 +++ …Admit impediments. Love is not loveWhich alters when it alteration finds,Or bends with the remover to remove; -SONNET 116 +++

‘Literate

+++What lover has he not outloved? What sage has he not outseen? -EMERSON from The Poet, or, Shakespeare +++ …This pursued through volumes would perhaps take us no further than this, that with a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration… -KEATS from the letters +++ “Obliterate the reader.”“Obliterate yourself before the reader.” -BLANCHOT  from Literature and the Right to Death  +++

My Shakespeare, my Shakespeare

+++ …why hast thou forsaken me? +++ “The story goes that, before or after he died, he found himself before God and he said: ‘I, who have been so many men in vain, want to be one man: myself.’ The voice of God replied from a whirlwind: ‘Neither am I one self; I dreamed the world as you dreamed your work, my Shakespeare, and among the shapes of my dream are you, who, like me, are many persons—and none.’ -BORGES, “Everything and Nothing”  +++ Sunday [21 Dec. 1817] Hampstead SundayMY DEAR BROTHERS,I must crave your pardon for not having written…

He’s all that

+++ “The trouble is that the writer is not only several people in one, but each stage of himself denies all the others, demands everything for itself alone and does not tolerate any conciliation or compromise. The writer must respond to several absolute and absolutely different commands at once, and his morality is made up of the confrontation and opposition of implacably hostile rules.  One rule says to him: “You will not write, you will remain nothingness, you will keep silent, you will not know words.” The other rule says: “Know nothing but words.” “Write to say nothing.” “Write to…

King Lear and the Very Bad Hair Day

OR King Leir and the Very Bad Heir Day The thing about King Lear for me is its bigness. Lear has big hair. Eighties big, teased out—And a crown of weeds, even! I feel little next to Lear. My hair cannot compete. It cannot. A.C. Bradley, probably the most influential 20th century critic of Shakespearian tragedy, agrees. He has written that to understand King Lear is to understand that we must “renounce the world, hate it, and lose it gladly. The only real thing in it is the soul, with its courage, patience, devotion. And nothing outward can touch that.”…

The Garden

+++ …by love into a single volume bound,the pages scattered through the universe… –DANTE +++ Those thoughts to me were oaks. –SHAKESPEARE +++ …a book made full of days (pages),a ready effort full of all places thenthat may be because I have loved them… –DUNCAN +++ Every book is a quotation; and every house is a quotationout of all forests and mines and stone quarries; and everyman is a quotation from all his ancestors. –EMERSON +++ To ask or search I blame thee not, for heavenIs as the book of God before thee set,Wherein to read his wondrous works, and…

How is’t, my soul? Let’s talk; it is not day.

SCENE V. Capulet’s orchard. Enter ROMEO and JULIET above, at the window JULIET Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day:It was the nightingale, and not the lark,That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear;Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree:Believe me, love, it was the nightingale. ROMEO It was the lark, the herald of the morn,No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaksDo lace the severing clouds in yonder east:Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund dayStands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.I must be gone and live, or stay and die. JULIET Yon light is not day-light, I…

BIRDZ

+++ ROMEO: I would I were thy bird.JULIET: Sweet, so would I.Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing. +++ ^KILL THEE WITH MUCH CHERISHING GET IT????

Like wonder-wounded hearers

+ + + HAMLET: A king of shreds and patches —[Enter GHOST in his nightgown]Save me and hover o’er me with your wings,You heavenly guards! [To GHOST] What would you, gracious figure? GERTRUDE: Alas, he’s mad. + + + What is he whose griefBears such an emphasis, whose phrase of sorrowConjures the wand’ring stars and makes them standLike wonder-wounded hearers? This is I,Hamlet the Dane. + + + If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,Absent thee from felicity a while,And in this harsh world draw thy breath in painTo tell my story. + + + Now cracks a…

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

+++ Tomorrow night, when Phoebe doth beholdHer silver visage in the wat’ry glass,Decking with liquid pearl the bladed grass —A time that lover’s slights doth still conceal —Through Athen’s gates have we devised to steal. +++ How now, spirit, wither wander you? +++ Or in the beached margin of the seaTo dance our ringlets to the whistling wind +++ How now, mad spirit?What nightrule now about this haunted grove? +++ Hermia: Why, get you gone. Who is’t that hinders you?Helena: A foolish heart that I leave here behind. +++ Where are these lads? Where are these hearts? +++

Collage

+++ Legato con amore in un volume, ció che per l’universo si squaderna: by love into a single volume bound, the pages scattered through the universe: – Paradiso, XXXIII +++ Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn – Sonnet LXVIII +++ To ask or search I blame thee not, for heavenIs as the book of God before thee set,Wherein to read his wondrous works, and learnHis seasons, hours, or days, or months, or years – Paradise Lost +++ a book made full of days (pages), a ready effort full of all places then that may be because I…

The Life and Death of King Richard II

+++ A jewel in a ten-times-barr’d up chest Is a bold spirit in a loyal breast. +++ Let him not come there To seek out sorrow that dwells everywhere. +++ Rouse up thy youthful blood, be valiant and live. +++ Strong as a tower in hope, I cry amen. +++ O thou, the earthly author of my blood, — +++ There is no virtue like necessity. +++ So, weeping-smiling greet I thee, my earth, +++ Like an unseasonable stormy day, Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores, As if the world were all dissolv’d to tears +++ I live…

The Life and Death of King Richard II

+++ A jewel in a ten-times-barr’d up chest Is a bold spirit in a loyal breast. +++ Let him not come there To seek out sorrow that dwells everywhere. +++ Rouse up thy youthful blood, be valiant and live. +++ Strong as a tower in hope, I cry amen. +++ O thou, the earthly author of my blood, — +++ There is no virtue like necessity. +++ So, weeping-smiling greet I thee, my earth, +++ Like an unseasonable stormy day, Which makes the silver rivers drown their shores, As if the world were all dissolv’d to tears +++ I live…

King John

+++ But from the inward motion to deliver Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age’s tooth === He that perforce robs lions of their hearts May easily win a woman’s. +++ Shadowing their right under your wings of war: I give you welcome with a powerless hand === The shadow of myself form’d in her eye; Which, being but the shadow of your son, Becomes a sun, and makes your son a shadow: I do protest I never lov’d myself Till now infixed I beheld myself Drawn in the flattering table of her eye. +++ There is no sin but…

King John

+++ But from the inward motion to deliver Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age’s tooth === He that perforce robs lions of their hearts May easily win a woman’s. +++ Shadowing their right under your wings of war: I give you welcome with a powerless hand === The shadow of myself form’d in her eye; Which, being but the shadow of your son, Becomes a sun, and makes your son a shadow: I do protest I never lov’d myself Till now infixed I beheld myself Drawn in the flattering table of her eye. +++ There is no sin but…

Lines from the sonnets

Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. And dig deep trenches in thy beauty’s field, Thou art thy mother’s glass, and she in thee Nature’s bequest gives nothing, but doth lend For never-resting time leads summer on Beauty o’ersnowed, and bareness everywhere: Then, were not summer’s distillation left, A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, Beauty’s effect with beauty were bereft, Nor it, nor no remembrance what it was. Make sweet some phial; treasure thou some place And having climb’d the steep-up heavenly hill Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly? Whose speechless song, being many,…

Lines from the sonnets

Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. And dig deep trenches in thy beauty’s field, Thou art thy mother’s glass, and she in thee Nature’s bequest gives nothing, but doth lend For never-resting time leads summer on Beauty o’ersnowed, and bareness everywhere: Then, were not summer’s distillation left, A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, Beauty’s effect with beauty were bereft, Nor it, nor no remembrance what it was. Make sweet some phial; treasure thou some place And having climb’d the steep-up heavenly hill Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly? Whose speechless song, being many,…

King Lear

— Nothing will come of nothing: speak again. — For by the sacred radiance of the sun,The mysteries of Hecate, and the night,By all the operation of the orbs,From we do exist and cease to be;Here I disclaim all my paternal care,Propinquity, and property of blood,And as a stranger to my heart and meHold thee, from this for ever. — Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend, — The terrors of the earth. — Strives in his little world of man to out-scornThe to-and-fro conflicting wind and rain — I am a manMore sinn’d against than sinning — When the mind’s freeThe body’s…

King Lear

— Nothing will come of nothing: speak again. — For by the sacred radiance of the sun,The mysteries of Hecate, and the night,By all the operation of the orbs,From we do exist and cease to be;Here I disclaim all my paternal care,Propinquity, and property of blood,And as a stranger to my heart and meHold thee, from this for ever. — Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend, — The terrors of the earth. — Strives in his little world of man to out-scornThe to-and-fro conflicting wind and rain — I am a manMore sinn’d against than sinning — When the mind’s freeThe body’s…

Othello

— For when my outward action doth demonstrate That native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern, ’tis not long after But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at: I am not what I am. — Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes In an extravagant and wheeling stranger Of here and everywhere. — Our bodies are gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners. — A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands; But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts. — No, let me know; And knowing what I…

Othello

— For when my outward action doth demonstrate That native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern, ’tis not long after But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at: I am not what I am. — Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes In an extravagant and wheeling stranger Of here and everywhere. — Our bodies are gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners. — A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands; But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts. — No, let me know; And knowing what I…

The Winter’s Tale

— We were, fair queen, Two lads that thought there were no more behind But such a day to-morrow as to-day, And to be boy eternal. — Is whispering nothing? Is leaning cheek to cheek? is meeting noses? Kissing with inside lip? stopping the career Of laughter with a sigh? — A note infallible Of breaking honesty; — horsing foot on foot? Skulking in corners? wishing clocks more swift? Hours, minutes? noon, midnight? and all eyes Blind with the pin and web, but their, their only, That would unseen be wicked? is this nothing? Why, then, the world and all…

The Winter’s Tale

— We were, fair queen, Two lads that thought there were no more behind But such a day to-morrow as to-day, And to be boy eternal. — Is whispering nothing? Is leaning cheek to cheek? is meeting noses? Kissing with inside lip? stopping the career Of laughter with a sigh? — A note infallible Of breaking honesty; — horsing foot on foot? Skulking in corners? wishing clocks more swift? Hours, minutes? noon, midnight? and all eyes Blind with the pin and web, but their, their only, That would unseen be wicked? is this nothing? Why, then, the world and all…

All’s Well That Ends Well

— He hath persecuted time with hope; and finds no other advantage in the process but only the losing of hope by time. — When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast none, remember they friends: get thee a good husband, and use him as he uses thee: so, farewell. — Our remedies often in ourselves do lie,Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated skyGives us free scope; only doth backward pullOur slow designs when we ourselves are dull. — By our remembrances of days foregone,Such were our faults: — Or then our faults seemed none. — Youth,…

All’s Well That Ends Well

— He hath persecuted time with hope; and finds no other advantage in the process but only the losing of hope by time. — When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast none, remember they friends: get thee a good husband, and use him as he uses thee: so, farewell. — Our remedies often in ourselves do lie,Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated skyGives us free scope; only doth backward pullOur slow designs when we ourselves are dull. — By our remembrances of days foregone,Such were our faults: — Or then our faults seemed none. — Youth,…

As You Like It

— Hereafter, in a world better than this,I shall desire more love and knowledge of you. — Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold. — Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, —The season’s difference: as the icy fangAnd churlish chiding of the winter’s wind,Which when it bites and blows upon my body,Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say,This is no flattery: these are counselorsThat feelingly persuade me what I am.Sweet are the uses of adversity;Which, like the toad, ugly and venomousWears yet a precious jewel in his head;And this our life, exempt from public haunt,Finds tongues…

As You Like It

— Hereafter, in a world better than this,I shall desire more love and knowledge of you. — Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold. — Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, —The season’s difference: as the icy fangAnd churlish chiding of the winter’s wind,Which when it bites and blows upon my body,Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say,This is no flattery: these are counselorsThat feelingly persuade me what I am.Sweet are the uses of adversity;Which, like the toad, ugly and venomousWears yet a precious jewel in his head;And this our life, exempt from public haunt,Finds tongues…

The Merchant of Venice

— By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is a-weary of this great world. — If to do were as as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces. — The devil can cite scripture for his purpose. — Some there be that shadows kiss;Such have but a shadow’s bliss — Then, if he lose, he makes a swan-like end,Fading in music: that the comparisonMay stand more proper, my eye shall be the streamAnd wat’ry death-bed for him. — The world is still deciv’d with ornament — How many…

The Merchant of Venice

— By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is a-weary of this great world. — If to do were as as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces. — The devil can cite scripture for his purpose. — Some there be that shadows kiss;Such have but a shadow’s bliss — Then, if he lose, he makes a swan-like end,Fading in music: that the comparisonMay stand more proper, my eye shall be the streamAnd wat’ry death-bed for him. — The world is still deciv’d with ornament — How many…

Love’s Labour’s Lost

— Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,Live register’d upon our brazen tombs,And then grace us in the disgrace of death;When, spite of cormorant devouring time,The endeavour of this present breath may buyThat honour which shall bate his scythe’s keen edge,And make us heirs of all eternity.Therefore, brave conquerors, —for so you are,That war against your own affections,And the huge army of the world’s desires, —Our late edict shal strongly stand in force:Navarre shall be the wonder of the world.Our court shall be a little Academe,Still and contemplative in living art. — The mind shall banquet though the…

Love’s Labour’s Lost

— Let fame, that all hunt after in their lives,Live register’d upon our brazen tombs,And then grace us in the disgrace of death;When, spite of cormorant devouring time,The endeavour of this present breath may buyThat honour which shall bate his scythe’s keen edge,And make us heirs of all eternity.Therefore, brave conquerors, —for so you are,That war against your own affections,And the huge army of the world’s desires, —Our late edict shal strongly stand in force:Navarre shall be the wonder of the world.Our court shall be a little Academe,Still and contemplative in living art. — The mind shall banquet though the…

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

— Ah me! for aught that ever I could read,Could ever hear by tale or history,The course of true love never did run smooth: — War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,Making it momentary as a sound,Swift as a shadow, short as any dream;Brief as the lightning in the collied nightThat, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earthAnd ere a man hath power to say, Behold!The jaws of darkness do devour it up:So quick bright things come to confusion. — And by that fire which burn’d the Carthage queen,When the false Trojan under sail was seen,—By all…

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

— Ah me! for aught that ever I could read,Could ever hear by tale or history,The course of true love never did run smooth: — War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,Making it momentary as a sound,Swift as a shadow, short as any dream;Brief as the lightning in the collied nightThat, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earthAnd ere a man hath power to say, Behold!The jaws of darkness do devour it up:So quick bright things come to confusion. — And by that fire which burn’d the Carthage queen,When the false Trojan under sail was seen,—By all…

Much Ado About Nothing

— I looked upon her with a soldier’s eye,That liked, but had a rougher task in handthan to drive liking to the name of love:But now I am return’d, and that war-thoughtsHave left their places vacant, in their roomsCome thronging soft and delicate desires — Shall quips, and sentences, and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humor? No: the world must be peopled. — I will requite thee;Taming my wild heart to thy loving hand — He hath a heart as sound as a bell. — Could she here denyThe story that…

Much Ado About Nothing

— I looked upon her with a soldier’s eye,That liked, but had a rougher task in handthan to drive liking to the name of love:But now I am return’d, and that war-thoughtsHave left their places vacant, in their roomsCome thronging soft and delicate desires — Shall quips, and sentences, and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humor? No: the world must be peopled. — I will requite thee;Taming my wild heart to thy loving hand — He hath a heart as sound as a bell. — Could she here denyThe story that…

Measure for Measure

— Elected him our absence to supply;Lent him our terror, drest him with our love — Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all!Some rise by sin and some by virtue fall:Some run from brakes of vice, and answer none;And some condemned for a fault alone. — For every pelting petty officerWould use his heaven for thunder: nothing but thunder. —Merciful heaven!Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt,Splitt’st the unwedgeable and gnarled oakThan the soft myrtle; — but man, proud man!Dress’d in a little brief authority, —Most ignorant of what he’s most assured,His glassy essence — Go to your…

Measure for Measure

— Elected him our absence to supply;Lent him our terror, drest him with our love — Well, heaven forgive him! and forgive us all!Some rise by sin and some by virtue fall:Some run from brakes of vice, and answer none;And some condemned for a fault alone. — For every pelting petty officerWould use his heaven for thunder: nothing but thunder. —Merciful heaven!Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt,Splitt’st the unwedgeable and gnarled oakThan the soft myrtle; — but man, proud man!Dress’d in a little brief authority, —Most ignorant of what he’s most assured,His glassy essence — Go to your…

Twelfth Night; Or, What You Will

— Confine? I’ll confine myself no finer than I am. — If you be not mad, be gone; if you have reason, be brief. — Lady, you be the cruelest she aliveIf you will lead these graces to the grave,And leave the world no copy. — Make me a willow cabin at your gate,And call upon my soul within the house;Write loyal cantons of contemmned love,And sing them loud, even in the dead of night;Holla your name to the reverberate hills,And make the babbling gossip of the airCry out, Olivia! — For folly, that he wisely shows, is fit;But wise…

Twelfth Night; Or, What You Will

— Confine? I’ll confine myself no finer than I am. — If you be not mad, be gone; if you have reason, be brief. — Lady, you be the cruelest she aliveIf you will lead these graces to the grave,And leave the world no copy. — Make me a willow cabin at your gate,And call upon my soul within the house;Write loyal cantons of contemmned love,And sing them loud, even in the dead of night;Holla your name to the reverberate hills,And make the babbling gossip of the airCry out, Olivia! — For folly, that he wisely shows, is fit;But wise…

Two Gentlemen of Verona

— Speed. If you love her, you cannot see her.Val. Why?Speed. Because love is blind. — Speed. How now, sir? what are you reasoning?Val. Nay, I was rhyming: ’tis you that have the reason. — Or fearing else some messenger that might her mind discover,Herself hath taught her love himself to write unto her lover– — Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can feed on air, I am one that am nourished by my victuals. — Jul. If you turn not you will return the sooner:Keep this remembrance for your Julia’s sake. (Giving a ring.) — So true…

Two Gentlemen of Verona

— Speed. If you love her, you cannot see her.Val. Why?Speed. Because love is blind. — Speed. How now, sir? what are you reasoning?Val. Nay, I was rhyming: ’tis you that have the reason. — Or fearing else some messenger that might her mind discover,Herself hath taught her love himself to write unto her lover– — Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can feed on air, I am one that am nourished by my victuals. — Jul. If you turn not you will return the sooner:Keep this remembrance for your Julia’s sake. (Giving a ring.) — So true…

The Tempest

Finally found a Collected Shakespeare I love, and thus have set forth to read the whole thing cover to cover. For whatever reason it starts with The Tempest. Bits from The Tempest I love: Full fathom five thy father lies;Of his bones are coral made;Those are pearls that were his eyes;Nothing of him that doth fade,But doth suffer a sea-changeInto something rich and strange. — I am the best of them that speak this speech,Were I but where tis spoken. — And, like the baseless fabric of this visionThe cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,The solemn temples, the great globe itself,Yea,…

The Tempest

Finally found a Collected Shakespeare I love, and thus have set forth to read the whole thing cover to cover. For whatever reason it starts with The Tempest. Bits from The Tempest I love: Full fathom five thy father lies;Of his bones are coral made;Those are pearls that were his eyes;Nothing of him that doth fade,But doth suffer a sea-changeInto something rich and strange. — I am the best of them that speak this speech,Were I but where tis spoken. — And, like the baseless fabric of this visionThe cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,The solemn temples, the great globe itself,Yea,…

Let us compare then, you and I

I think it is undeniable that Frank O’Hara’s “To the Harbormaster” is based in some part on Shakespeare’s sonnet number 117. Either that, or we can just take comfort from the fact that the same metaphors have been used by two minds from across the ages to express the same idea. Sonnett 117by William Shakespeare Accuse me thus: that I have scanted allWherein I should your great deserts repay, Forgot upon your dearest love to call, Whereto all bonds do tie me day by day; That I have frequent been with unknown minds And given to time your own dear-purchased…

Let us compare then, you and I

I think it is undeniable that Frank O’Hara’s “To the Harbormaster” is based in some part on Shakespeare’s sonnet number 117. Either that, or we can just take comfort from the fact that the same metaphors have been used by two minds from across the ages to express the same idea. Sonnett 117by William Shakespeare Accuse me thus: that I have scanted allWherein I should your great deserts repay, Forgot upon your dearest love to call, Whereto all bonds do tie me day by day; That I have frequent been with unknown minds And given to time your own dear-purchased…