At least two hours, Margaret!!

+++ Jane Austen, from Sense and Sensibility, chapter 9 +++ “They gaily ascended the downs, rejoicing in their own penetration at every glimpse of blue sky; and when they caught in their faces the animating gales of a high southwesterly wind, they pitied the fears which had prevented their mother and Elinor from sharing such delightful sensations. ‘Is there a felicity in the world,’ said Marianne, ‘superior to this?- Margaret, we will walk here at least two hours.’ Margaret agreed, and they pursued their way against the wind, resisting it with laughing delight for about twenty minutes longer, when suddenly…

Now, to marry all the world.

+++Jane Austen, from Sense and Sensibility, chapter 8 +++ “Mrs. Jennings was a widow with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now, therefore, nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world. In the promotion of this object she was zealously active, as far as her ability reached; and missed no opportunity of projecting weddings among all the young people of her acquaintance. She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and…

Self-fulfilling Vocabulary

Rhodomontade, noun and adj. a. A vainglorious brag or boast; an extravagantly boastful, arrogant, or bombastic speech or piece of writing; †an arrogant act (obs.). THANKS JANE Amphiboly, noun.  1. Ambiguous discourse; a sentence which may be construed in two distinct senses; a quibble. (See amphibology n., which is the earlier and more popular word.)2. A figure of speech: Ambiguity arising from the uncertain construction of a sentence or clause, of which the individual words are unequivocal: thus distinguished by logicians from equivocation, though in popular use the two are confused. “though in popular use the two are confused” THANKS WILLIAM 

Spirit reader

+++ From “Note to The Thorn” (1800) WILLIAM WORDSWORTH +++ “It was necessary that the Poem, to be natural, should in reality move slowly; yet I hoped, that, by the aid of the meter, to those who should at all enter the spirit of the Poem, it would appear to move quickly.” +++ “For the reader cannot be too often reminded that Poetry is passion: it is the history or science of feelings: now every man must know that an attempt to rarely made to communicate impassioned feelings without something of an accompanying consciousness of the inadequateness of our own powers, or the deficiencies…

Experimental since 1798

Advertisement to Lyrical Ballads (1798) WILLIAM WORDSWORTH It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind. The evidence of this fact is to be sought, not in the writings of Critics, but in those of Poets themselves. The majority of the following poems are to be considered as experiments. They were written chiefly with a view to ascertain how far the language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society is adapted to the purposes of poetic pleasure. Readers accustomed to the gaudiness and…

BIRDZ

+++ ROMEO: I would I were thy bird.JULIET: Sweet, so would I.Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing. +++ ^KILL THEE WITH MUCH CHERISHING GET IT????

What then I was… A feeling and a love

LINES COMPOSED A FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour. July 13, 1798 BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH Five years have past; five summers, with the length Of five long winters! and again I hear These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs With a soft inland murmur.—Once again Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs, That on a wild secluded scene impress Thoughts of more deep seclusion; and connect The landscape with the quiet of the sky. The day is come when I again repose Here, under this dark sycamore, and view These plots of…

Owlz

THERE WAS A BOY BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH There was a Boy; ye knew him well, ye cliffs And islands of Winander! many a time, At evening, when the earliest stars began To move along the edges of the hills, Rising or setting, would he stand alone, Beneath the trees, or by the glimmering lake; And there, with fingers interwoven, both hands Pressed closely palm to palm and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument, Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls That they might answer him.—And they would shout Across the watery vale, and shout again, Responsive to his…

Work

+++ “…He who is willing to work gives birth to his own father.” -Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling +++ “A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty.”-Emerson, Self Reliance+++(via The Anxiety of Influence)