Freud, heartbreaking Freud

“The loss of love and the failure that this represents leaves an enduring legacy of diminished self-feeling amounting to a narcissistic scar; in my experience, as also corroborated by the findings of Marcinowski (1918), this contributes more than any other factor to the ‘feeling of inferiority’ so common in neurotics.” –Beyond the Pleasure Principle, 1920 (Trans. Reddick 2003) That sentence, specifically the clause “in my experience,” ushered by under the cloak of “findings” and a citation, is to me the most poignant moment in his work. “It would contradict the conservative nature of drives if the goal of life were…

Freud, heartbreaking Freud

“The loss of love and the failure that this represents leaves an enduring legacy of diminished self-feeling amounting to a narcissistic scar; in my experience, as also corroborated by the findings of Marcinowski (1918), this contributes more than any other factor to the ‘feeling of inferiority’ so common in neurotics.” –Beyond the Pleasure Principle, 1920 (Trans. Reddick 2003) That sentence, specifically the clause “in my experience,” ushered by under the cloak of “findings” and a citation, is to me the most poignant moment in his work. “It would contradict the conservative nature of drives if the goal of life were…

Death in Venice

“‘You see, Aschenbach has always lived like this’ — here the speaker closed the fingers of his left hand to a fist — ‘never like this’– and he let his open hand hang relaxed from the back of his chair. It was apt.” (pg 9, translation by H.T. Lowe Porter)“His love of the ocean had profound sources: the hard-worked artist’s longing for rest, his yearning to seek refuge from the thronging manifold shapes of his fancy in the bosom of the simple and vast; and another yearning, opposed to his art and perhaps for that very reason a lure, for…

Death in Venice

“‘You see, Aschenbach has always lived like this’ — here the speaker closed the fingers of his left hand to a fist — ‘never like this’– and he let his open hand hang relaxed from the back of his chair. It was apt.” (pg 9, translation by H.T. Lowe Porter)“His love of the ocean had profound sources: the hard-worked artist’s longing for rest, his yearning to seek refuge from the thronging manifold shapes of his fancy in the bosom of the simple and vast; and another yearning, opposed to his art and perhaps for that very reason a lure, for…