vocab

peccadillo, n. A minor fault or sin; a trivial offence.peregrinate, v. To travel, journey; to go from place to place. Also fig. acme, n. 1. The highest point or culmination; the point or period at which something is at its best or most highly developed; (in later use also) a person or thing representing or embodying this. effulgence, n. The quality of being effulgent, splendid radiance. lit. and fig. pirogue, n. Originally: a long narrow canoe hollowed from the trunk of a single tree; =n. 1. Subsequently also: any of various kinds of canoe or small open boat.

vocab

peccadillo, n. A minor fault or sin; a trivial offence.peregrinate, v. To travel, journey; to go from place to place. Also fig. acme, n. 1. The highest point or culmination; the point or period at which something is at its best or most highly developed; (in later use also) a person or thing representing or embodying this. effulgence, n. The quality of being effulgent, splendid radiance. lit. and fig. pirogue, n. Originally: a long narrow canoe hollowed from the trunk of a single tree; =n. 1. Subsequently also: any of various kinds of canoe or small open boat.

vocab

parhelion – (n.) a bright spot in the sky appearing on either side of the sun, formed by refraction of sunlight through ice crystals high in the earth’s atmosphere. Also called a “sun dog”.

vocab

parhelion – (n.) a bright spot in the sky appearing on either side of the sun, formed by refraction of sunlight through ice crystals high in the earth’s atmosphere. Also called a “sun dog”.

I’m so vain I think Moby Dick is about me

It’s an all-nighter; I’m writing a paper on Moby Dick side-by-side with the boy I’ve been kissing… Closest to romantic one comes in college, I imagine. Anyway, this passage is TDF: “…the tormented spirit that glared out of bodily eyes, when what seemed Ahab rushed from his room, was for the time but a vacated thing, a formless, somnambulistic being, a ray of living light, to be sure, but without an object to color, and therefore a blankness in itself. God help thee, old man, thy thoughts have created a creature in thee’ and he whose intense thinking thus makes…

I’m so vain I think Moby Dick is about me

It’s an all-nighter; I’m writing a paper on Moby Dick side-by-side with the boy I’ve been kissing… Closest to romantic one comes in college, I imagine. Anyway, this passage is TDF: “…the tormented spirit that glared out of bodily eyes, when what seemed Ahab rushed from his room, was for the time but a vacated thing, a formless, somnambulistic being, a ray of living light, to be sure, but without an object to color, and therefore a blankness in itself. God help thee, old man, thy thoughts have created a creature in thee’ and he whose intense thinking thus makes…

Saturday of Winter Carnival, sigh

I’m a little bit drunk, in a conference room in Fairchild, with dozens and dozens of my poems laid out on the table, drawing diagrams and writing epigrams on a whiteboard, moving in and out of landscapes, frames of mind. Hilary is writing a chapter for her art history thesis on early modern portraiture, Andrew is working on his earth sciences thesis about core samples and climate change… I am working on my poems. Hah. Anyway, just need to record this moment in time when this I cannot think of another poem I have ever loved more than “To the…

Saturday of Winter Carnival, sigh

I’m a little bit drunk, in a conference room in Fairchild, with dozens and dozens of my poems laid out on the table, drawing diagrams and writing epigrams on a whiteboard, moving in and out of landscapes, frames of mind. Hilary is writing a chapter for her art history thesis on early modern portraiture, Andrew is working on his earth sciences thesis about core samples and climate change… I am working on my poems. Hah. Anyway, just need to record this moment in time when this I cannot think of another poem I have ever loved more than “To the…

Robert Lowell

All my favorite Robert Lowell poems in one place, just in case I need them. Which I often do. ON THE END OF THE PHONE My sidestepping and obliquities, unableto take the obvious truth on any subject—why do I do what I do not want to say,able to understand and not to hear?Your rapier voice—I have had so much—hundred words a minute, piercing and trilling…the invincible lifedrive of everything alive,ringing down silver dollars with each word….Love wasn’t what went wrong, we kept our daughter;What a good father is is no man’s boast—to be still friends when we’re no longer children….Why…

Robert Lowell

All my favorite Robert Lowell poems in one place, just in case I need them. Which I often do. ON THE END OF THE PHONE My sidestepping and obliquities, unableto take the obvious truth on any subject—why do I do what I do not want to say,able to understand and not to hear?Your rapier voice—I have had so much—hundred words a minute, piercing and trilling…the invincible lifedrive of everything alive,ringing down silver dollars with each word….Love wasn’t what went wrong, we kept our daughter;What a good father is is no man’s boast—to be still friends when we’re no longer children….Why…

vocab

Panglossian \pan-GLAH-see-un\ adjective: marked by the view that all is for the best, in this best of possible worlds :excessively optimistic Example sentence:Even the most Panglossian temperament would have had trouble finding the good inthis situation. Did you know?Dr. Pangloss was the pedantic old tutor in Voltaire’s satirical novel Candide.Pangloss was an incurable, albeit misguided, optimist who claimed that “all isfor the best in this best of all possible worlds.” So persistent was he in hisoptimism that he kept it even after witnessing and experiencing great crueltyand suffering. The name “Pangloss” comes from Greek “pan,” meaning “all,” and

vocab

Panglossian \pan-GLAH-see-un\ adjective: marked by the view that all is for the best, in this best of possible worlds :excessively optimistic Example sentence:Even the most Panglossian temperament would have had trouble finding the good inthis situation. Did you know?Dr. Pangloss was the pedantic old tutor in Voltaire’s satirical novel Candide.Pangloss was an incurable, albeit misguided, optimist who claimed that “all isfor the best in this best of all possible worlds.” So persistent was he in hisoptimism that he kept it even after witnessing and experiencing great crueltyand suffering. The name “Pangloss” comes from Greek “pan,” meaning “all,” and

vocab – Aztecs

agnatic adj. 1. Related on or descended from the father’s or male side. 2. Coming from a common source; akin. n. A relative on the father’s or male side only.

vocab – Aztecs

agnatic adj. 1. Related on or descended from the father’s or male side. 2. Coming from a common source; akin. n. A relative on the father’s or male side only.

courtesy of Washington Irving

virago–noun, plural -goes, -gos. 1. a loud-voiced, ill-tempered, scolding woman; shrew. 2. Archaic. a woman of strength or spirit–noun termagant 1. a violent, turbulent, or brawling woman. 2. (initial capital letter) a mythical deity popularly believed in the Middle Ages to be worshiped by the Muslims and introduced into the morality play as a violent, overbearing personage in long robes.

courtesy of Washington Irving

virago–noun, plural -goes, -gos. 1. a loud-voiced, ill-tempered, scolding woman; shrew. 2. Archaic. a woman of strength or spirit–noun termagant 1. a violent, turbulent, or brawling woman. 2. (initial capital letter) a mythical deity popularly believed in the Middle Ages to be worshiped by the Muslims and introduced into the morality play as a violent, overbearing personage in long robes.