vocab (Philosophy of Art)

gestalt, n.A ‘shape’, ‘configuration’, or ‘structure’ which as an object of perception forms a specific whole or unity incapable of expression simply in terms of its parts (e.g. a melody in distinction from the notes that make it up); cf. CONFIGURATION 6. Freq. attrib., as Gestalt psychology, a school of psychology which holds that perceptions, reactions, etc., are Gestalts; also ellipt.

vocab (Philosophy of Art)

gestalt, n.A ‘shape’, ‘configuration’, or ‘structure’ which as an object of perception forms a specific whole or unity incapable of expression simply in terms of its parts (e.g. a melody in distinction from the notes that make it up); cf. CONFIGURATION 6. Freq. attrib., as Gestalt psychology, a school of psychology which holds that perceptions, reactions, etc., are Gestalts; also ellipt.

Vocab (Aristotle)

deux ex machina A power, event, person, or thing that comes in the nick of time to solve a difficulty; providential interposition, esp. in a novel or play. cavil, v. 1. intr. ‘To raise captious and frivolous objections’ (J.); to object, dispute, or find fault unfairly or without good reason. Const. at, about(formerly also against, with, on). 2. trans. To object to or find fault with captiously. eschatology a. The department of theological science concerned with ‘the four last things: death, judgement, heaven, and hell’. encomium, n. A formal or high-flown expression of praise; a eulogy, panegyric.

Vocab (Aristotle)

deux ex machina A power, event, person, or thing that comes in the nick of time to solve a difficulty; providential interposition, esp. in a novel or play. cavil, v. 1. intr. ‘To raise captious and frivolous objections’ (J.); to object, dispute, or find fault unfairly or without good reason. Const. at, about(formerly also against, with, on). 2. trans. To object to or find fault with captiously. eschatology a. The department of theological science concerned with ‘the four last things: death, judgement, heaven, and hell’. encomium, n. A formal or high-flown expression of praise; a eulogy, panegyric.

Amazing

———- Forwarded message ———- From: Hilary B. Becker Date: 2009/10/22Subject:To: “Matthew P. Ritger” a troubling of golfisha marmalade of poniesa charm of hummingbirdsa risk of lobstersa smack of jellyfish circumstantial venery:a kettle of hawks (when in flight)a raft of auks (when bobbing in the ocean)a skein of geese (when in flight)a parliament of owls (when roosting)

Amazing

———- Forwarded message ———- From: Hilary B. Becker Date: 2009/10/22Subject:To: “Matthew P. Ritger” a troubling of golfisha marmalade of poniesa charm of hummingbirdsa risk of lobstersa smack of jellyfish circumstantial venery:a kettle of hawks (when in flight)a raft of auks (when bobbing in the ocean)a skein of geese (when in flight)a parliament of owls (when roosting)

vocab (thanks to Goodman’s When is Art)

sa·li·ent adj1. particularly noticeable, striking, or relevant2. sticking out from a surface3. used to describe an angle that projects outward from a polygon4. represented as a jumping or leaping animal

The Marriage (between China and the US)

Andrew wants to kiss a Sarah, because it’s a lovely name without any immediate negative connotations. Meanwhile, in China, they are naming their daughter things likes, @, and &, because these neo-symbols don’t correspond to 1.9 million other @s, like there would be if you named her the symbol for Kim or whichever common name — There was a great article in National Geo about it, which I can’t find right now, but yeah. Derrida: “Such is the question: the marriage between speech and Being in the unique word, in the finally proper name. Such is the question that enters…

The Marriage (between China and the US)

Andrew wants to kiss a Sarah, because it’s a lovely name without any immediate negative connotations. Meanwhile, in China, they are naming their daughter things likes, @, and &, because these neo-symbols don’t correspond to 1.9 million other @s, like there would be if you named her the symbol for Chang or whatever — There was a great article in National Geo about it, which I can’t find right now, but yeah. Derrida: “Such is the question: the marriage between speech and Being in the unique word, in the finally proper name. Such is the question that enters into the…

vocab (thanks to Derrida)

symploke, nounA figure consisting in the repetition of one word or phrase at the beginning, and of another at the end, of successive clauses or sentences; a combination of anaphora and epistrophe. epistrophe, noun1. Rhet. A figure of speech in which each sentence or clause ends with the same word. protention, nounIn phenomenology: extension of the consciousness of some present act or event into the future; an instance of this. cathexis, noun The concentration or accumulation of mental energy in a particular channel.

vocab (thanks to Derrida)

symploke, nounA figure consisting in the repetition of one word or phrase at the beginning, and of another at the end, of successive clauses or sentences; a combination of anaphora and epistrophe. epistrophe, noun1. Rhet. A figure of speech in which each sentence or clause ends with the same word. protention, nounIn phenomenology: extension of the consciousness of some present act or event into the future; an instance of this. cathexis, noun The concentration or accumulation of mental energy in a particular channel.

vocab (thanks to Joan Didion)

koan, noun In Zen Buddhism, a paradox put to a student to stimulate his mind. aphasia, nounLoss of speech, partial or total, or loss of power to understand written or spoken language, as a result of disorder of the cerebral speech centres. ag·it·prop noun1. political propaganda, especially pro-Communist, and especially when disseminated through literature, drama, music, or art2. artistic work or works serving as a vehicle for political propagandatabula rasa, noun(Latin: blank slate) refers to the epistemological thesis that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that their knowledge comes from experience and perception. epistemology, nounThe theory or science…

vocab (thanks to Joan Didion)

koan, noun In Zen Buddhism, a paradox put to a student to stimulate his mind. aphasia, nounLoss of speech, partial or total, or loss of power to understand written or spoken language, as a result of disorder of the cerebral speech centres. ag·it·prop noun1. political propaganda, especially pro-Communist, and especially when disseminated through literature, drama, music, or art2. artistic work or works serving as a vehicle for political propagandatabula rasa, noun(Latin: blank slate) refers to the epistemological thesis that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that their knowledge comes from experience and perception. epistemology, nounThe theory or science…

Thoughts on Barthes’ "Mythologies"

With Mythologies, Roland Barthes gives semiology legs. Barthes expands upon Ferdinand de Saussure’s study of signs by subsuming the tripod of signifier, signified and sign, previously used primarily in decoding units of language or language-objects, as Barthes prefers (words, art, rituals, material culture) and using this tripod to map what he terms myth — that is, a metalanguage, where signs themselves are only signifiers in a greater chain of cultural connotation. For Barthes, myth begins with the sum of signs and extends to a “greater,” “global” system, necessitating the semiotician’s analysis as a schema that not only “makes us understand…

Thoughts on Barthes’ "Mythologies"

With Mythologies, Roland Barthes gives semiology legs. Barthes expands upon Ferdinand de Saussure’s study of signs by subsuming the tripod of signifier, signified and sign, previously used primarily in decoding units of language or language-objects, as Barthes prefers (words, art, rituals, material culture) and using this tripod to map what he terms myth — that is, a metalanguage, where signs themselves are only signifiers in a greater chain of cultural connotation. For Barthes, myth begins with the sum of signs and extends to a “greater,” “global” system, necessitating the semiotician’s analysis as a schema that not only “makes us understand…

Lacan

“At the culmination of the historical effort of a society to refuse to recognize that it has any function other than the utilitarian one, and in the anxiety of the individual confronting the ‘concentrational’ form of the social bond that seems to arise to crown this effort, existentialism must be judged by the explanations it gives of the subjective impasses that have indeed resulted from it; a freedom that is never more authentic than when it is within the walls of a prison, a demand for commitment, expressing the impotence of a pure consciousness to master any situation; a voyeuristic-sadistic…

Lacan

“At the culmination of the historical effort of a society to refuse to recognize that it has any function other than the utilitarian one, and in the anxiety of the individual confronting the ‘concentrational’ form of the social bond that seems to arise to crown this effort, existentialism must be judged by the explanations it gives of the subjective impasses that have indeed resulted from it; a freedom that is never more authentic than when it is within the walls of a prison, a demand for commitment, expressing the impotence of a pure consciousness to master any situation; a voyeuristic-sadistic…

vocab (thanks to Lacan)

erogenic, adjThat gives rise to sexual desire. dehiscence, nounGaping, opening by divergence of parts, esp. as a natural process: a. Bot. The bursting open of capsules, fruits, anthers, etc. in order to discharge their mature contents. quadrature, nounThe quality, state, or condition of being quadrate or quadrangular; squareness; (also) a square or rectangle (obs.). Now rare. ergodic, adjOf a trajectory in a confined portion of space: having the property that in the limit all points of the space will be included in the trajectory with equal frequency. Of a stochastic process: having the property that the probability of any state…

vocab (thanks to Lacan)

erogenic, adjThat gives rise to sexual desire. dehiscence, nounGaping, opening by divergence of parts, esp. as a natural process: a. Bot. The bursting open of capsules, fruits, anthers, etc. in order to discharge their mature contents. quadrature, nounThe quality, state, or condition of being quadrate or quadrangular; squareness; (also) a square or rectangle (obs.). Now rare. ergodic, adjOf a trajectory in a confined portion of space: having the property that in the limit all points of the space will be included in the trajectory with equal frequency. Of a stochastic process: having the property that the probability of any state…

Derrida: Differance

“We could thus take up all the coupled oppositions on which philosophy is constructed, and from which our language lives, not in order to see oppositition vanish but to see the emergence of a necessity such that one of the terms appears as the differance of the other, the other as “differed” within the systematic ordering of the same (e.g., the intelligible as differing from the sensible, as sensible differed; the concept as differed-differing intuition, life as differing-differed matter; mind as differed-differing life; culture as differed-differing nature; and all the terms designating what in other than physis – techne, nomos,…

Derrida: Differance

“We could thus take up all the coupled oppositions on which philosophy is constructed, and from which our language lives, not in order to see oppositition vanish but to see the emergence of a necessity such that one of the terms appears as the differance of the other, the other as “differed” within the systematic ordering of the same (e.g., the intelligible as differing from the sensible, as sensible differed; the concept as differed-differing intuition, life as differing-differed matter; mind as differed-differing life; culture as differed-differing nature; and all the terms designating what in other than physis – techne, nomos,…

vocab

kerygma nounPreaching; proclamation of religious truth.kerygmatic –adj adiaphorism nounReligious or theological indifference; indifferentism, latitudinarianism.

vocab

kerygma nounPreaching; proclamation of religious truth.kerygmatic –adj adiaphorism nounReligious or theological indifference; indifferentism, latitudinarianism.

vocab

di·a·lec·tic n1. the tension that exists between two conflicting or interacting forces, elements, or ideas2. the investigation of the truth through discussion, or the art of investigating truths through discussion3. di·a·lec·tic or di·a·lec·tics debate intended to resolve a conflict between two contradictory or apparently contradictory ideas or elements logically, establishing truths on both sides rather than disproving one argument (takes a singular verb)4. the process, in Hegelian and Marxist thought, in which two apparently opposed ideas, the thesis and antithesis, become combined in a unified whole, the synthesis5. the methods used in Socratic philosophy to reveal truth through disputation su·per·ven·ient…

vocab

di·a·lec·tic n1. the tension that exists between two conflicting or interacting forces, elements, or ideas2. the investigation of the truth through discussion, or the art of investigating truths through discussion3. di·a·lec·tic or di·a·lec·tics debate intended to resolve a conflict between two contradictory or apparently contradictory ideas or elements logically, establishing truths on both sides rather than disproving one argument (takes a singular verb)4. the process, in Hegelian and Marxist thought, in which two apparently opposed ideas, the thesis and antithesis, become combined in a unified whole, the synthesis5. the methods used in Socratic philosophy to reveal truth through disputation su·per·ven·ient…

Nietzsche, niche

“In summa: the world as it ought to be exists; this world, in which we live, is an error — this world of ours ought not to exist.…The belief that the world as it ought to be is, really exists, is a belief of the unproductive who do not desire to create a world as it ought to be. They posit it as already available, they seek ways and means of reaching it. “Will to truth” — as the failure of the will to create.” -Friedrich Nietzsche, from The Will to Power

Nietzsche, niche

“In summa: the world as it ought to be exists; this world, in which we live, is an error — this world of ours ought not to exist.…The belief that the world as it ought to be is, really exists, is a belief of the unproductive who do not desire to create a world as it ought to be. They posit it as already available, they seek ways oand means of reaching it. “Will to truth” — as the failure of the will to create.” -Friedrich Nietzsche, from The Will to Power

vocab

tau·tol·o·gy n1. a redundant repetition of a meaning in a sentence or idea using different words2. an instance of redundant repetition3. a proposition or statement that, in itself, is logically true tel·e·ol·o·gy n1. the study of ultimate causes in nature2. an approach to ethics that studies actions in relations to their ends or utility3. any activity that tends towards the achievement of a goal me·ton·y·my na figure of speech in which an attribute of something is used to stand for the thing itself, such as “laurels” when it stands for “glory” or “brass” when it stands for “military officers”

vocab

tau·tol·o·gy n1. a redundant repetition of a meaning in a sentence or idea using different words2. an instance of redundant repetition3. a proposition or statement that, in itself, is logically true tel·e·ol·o·gy n1. the study of ultimate causes in nature2. an approach to ethics that studies actions in relations to their ends or utility3. any activity that tends towards the achievement of a goal me·ton·y·my na figure of speech in which an attribute of something is used to stand for the thing itself, such as “laurels” when it stands for “glory” or “brass” when it stands for “military officers”

Nietzsche, niche

“What therefore is truth? A mobile army of metaphors, metonymies, anthropomorphisms: in short a sum of human relations which became poetically and rhetorically intensified, metamorphosed, adorned, and after long usage seem to a notion fixed, canonic, and binding; truths are ilusions of which one has forgotten that they are illusions; worn-out metaphors which have become powerless to affect the senses; coins which have their obverse effaced and now are no longer of account as coins but merely as metal.” –Nietzsche, from On Truth and Lying in an Extra-moral Sense

Nietzsche, niche

“What therefore is truth? A mobile army of metaphors, metonymies, anthropomorphisms: in short a sum of human relations which became poetically and rhetorically intensified, metamorphosed, adorned, and after long usage seem to a notion fixed, canonic, and binding; truths are ilusions of which one has forgotten that they are illusions; worn-out metaphors which have become powerless to affect the senses; coins which have their obverse effaced and now are no longer of account as coins but merely as metal.” –Nietzsche, from On Truth and Lying in an Extra-moral Sense